Dancing to the rhythm of life

COVID wasn’t easy for any of us. We all have encountered something that we are not going to forget any time soon. Every time I go outside, I want to avoid doing so because going out with a mask on is not at all easy, especially when you are disabled. Although COVID is no longer a serious threat, we are used to quarantine and are still afraid of interacting with one another. We are comfortable staying in our homes and are still leery of others around us. As a result, we will have a tough time transitioning back to our old routines.

It is hard to imagine a world without COVID. Post COVID, there will be a lot of emphasis on financial stability. I know many people with disabilities who have lost their jobs because of the pandemic. Most companies are concerned with profit instead of inclusion and accessibility, giving the option to work from home which may be a great thing as we need not to worry about physical limitations as much.  On the other hand, organisations may never understand the need for an inclusive environment as each one  is busy in a small isolated environment. I personally like this virtual world with isolation as I have to deal  less with my physical limitations. However, I know many people who don’t like this virtual world because they need human interaction to learn and understand. There are many people with disabilities who were never afforded an education and now they have to learn on their own. This is because the real world seems to be at the edge of extinction and everything is now done virtually.

The virtual world is a new world for all of us and it poses many challenges for those with disabilities. I have cerebral palsy with chronic pain but I try my best to keep moving forward. No one truly knows if and when COVID will end. It is an invisible monster. I do believe, though, that there will be more opportunities for the disabled community in the future because of the evolving virtual world. Physical limitations may not hinder people as much while working virtually. Companies won’t have an excuse for not hiring disabled people. It is important for those of us with disabilities to continue striving for more. We need to focus on our abilities, not our disabilities. We work hard every day for a better future. We, as members of the disabled community, need not control life. Instead, we should learn to dance to the rhythm of life.

Sidharth Taneja
Sidharth Taneja

Sidharth Taneja is a software engineer with a leading MNC and was the recipient of the Mastery Award at the 2015 CavinKare Ability Awards for Achievers with Disabilities.

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